Chris Hooper known as ‘Pineapple’ could become Rockhampton’s new mayor

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36005938 8977879 image a 29 1606142028390

Meet Australia’s zaniest mayor: Boss of major Queensland town is nicknamed ‘Pineapple’ because of his rough head, turns guitars into didgeridoos – and wants to BAN cars

  • Rockhampton mayor dubbed ‘Pineapple’ thanks to rough hair he rocked as teen
  • Chris Hooper was offered the role after predecessor resigned earlier this month
  • Margaret Strelow won 70 per cent of votes compared to Mr Hooper’s 30 per cent
  • He’s still not been appointed as mayor accusing government/council of stalling

The unlikely new mayor of a Queensland town has been dubbed ‘Pineapple’ thanks to the rough hair he rocked as a teenager – and will soon take the position despite gaining just 30 per cent of votes. 

Chris Hooper is known for playing his acoustic guitar like a didgeridoo, wanting to ban cars as well as riding his bike barefoot, and being vehemently against the Adani mine. 

His unusual nickname comes thanks to his previous afro haircut, which he would be spotted sporting as he sped through town on his Harley Davidson – and also because of his ‘rough head’.

The eccentric politico was offered the role of Rockhampton’s mayor after his predecessor Margaret Strelow resigned earlier this month after being found guilty of misconduct by the Councillor Conduct Tribunal.

Ms Strewlow had won 70 per cent of votes when she became mayor compared to Mr Hooper’s only 30 per cent. 

Chris Hooper (pictured) is known for playing his acoustic guitar like a didgeridoo, wanting to ban cars as well as riding his bike barefoot, and being against the Adani mine

Chris Hooper (pictured) is known for playing his acoustic guitar like a didgeridoo, wanting to ban cars as well as riding his bike barefoot, and being against the Adani mine

Mr Hooper (pictured) was offered the role of Rockhampton's mayor after his predecessor Margaret Strelow resigned earlier this month after being found guilty of misconduct

Mr Hooper (pictured) was offered the role of Rockhampton’s mayor after his predecessor Margaret Strelow resigned earlier this month after being found guilty of misconduct

Under Queensland law which was introduced in June, if a mayor steps down within 12 months of being appointed, the runner up automatically becomes the new mayor.  

The former train driver accepted the job after getting a call early in the morning from the Electoral Commission Queensland. 

But Mr Hooper has still not been appointed in his new role, accusing the state government and local council of stalling the process. 

The government is looking to amend the law to trigger a by-election, stating that it’s not fair for the people to have a leader that most didn’t vote for.

‘They’re trying to delay it so they can bring the act in before I’m sworn in,’ he told The Australian.

‘They’ve been playing games all the way along. I’ve been voted in by the rules they brought in ­before the election.’

Mr Hooper (pictured) has still not been appointed in his new role, accusing the state government and local council of stalling the process

Mr Hooper (pictured) has still not been appointed in his new role, accusing the state government and local council of stalling the process

Mr Hooper said that when he is appointed mayor he would donate his salary to charity, saying he would only accept $1 in payment

Mr Hooper said that when he is appointed mayor he would donate his salary to charity, saying he would only accept $1 in payment

The amendment will be introduced to parliament on December 1 but until then the ECQ says the current law should be followed.

‘I might get two days as mayor or something,’ Mr Hooper told ABC

Deputy Premier and Local Government Minister Steven Miles said Mr Hooper should ‘feel free’ to run again if there is a by-election. 

Mr Hooper said that when he is appointed mayor he would donate his salary to charity, saying he would only accept $1 in payment.

He wants to bring new business to Rockhampton and offers up free space for locals to come in and paint art.  

Chris Hooper (pictured) makes his way down East Street in Rockhampton, in July 2011 - years before making his political ambitions a reality

Chris Hooper (pictured) makes his way down East Street in Rockhampton, in July 2011 – years before making his political ambitions a reality

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About Craig Ballantyne 22263 Articles
I love anything to do with Harley Davidson and have two beautiful children and a beautiful partner. In my spare time i like building websites and love anything to do with the internet.

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